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ART AND MEDICINE
Year : 2003  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 8 Table of Contents     

Medicine in Graphic Satire


Date of Web Publication22-Jun-2010

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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How to cite this article:
. Medicine in Graphic Satire. Heart Views 2003;4:8

How to cite this URL:
. Medicine in Graphic Satire. Heart Views [serial online] 2003 [cited 2020 Sep 25];4:8. Available from: http://www.heartviews.org/text.asp?2003/4/2/8/64468

Physicians: Quackery in Camouflage

Consultation of Physicians or Company of Undertakers

[Additional file 1]

A group of bewigged and pompous looking physicians examine the quality of the urine of a rich patient, therefore the extraordinary solemnity of the deliberation. Some inspect the urine with their spectacles and one even examines it with his tongue! A Latin inscription at the bottom reads: Et plurima mortis imago, i.e. "Everywhere the face of death."

Therapeutic Violence

[Additional file 2]

Treatment in the days before anesthesia was as painful as the ailment.

Corruption & Ineffectiveness of Physicians


[Additional file 3]

In 1796 Elisha Perkins, a physician from Connecticut, patented the metallic tractors shown in this print. He claimed the tractors could cure disease through electric force.

The Central Board of Health: Cholera Consultation

[Additional file 4]

In the early nineteenth century cholera epidemics were common, instilling fear in the public. Medical science was ineffective against cholera until John Snow's discovery of its contagion through contaminated water in 1848. Callouts of health officials toasting each other read: "Long life to our Central Board . . . May we preserve our health by bleeding the country . . ."

In the early nineteenth century cholera epidemics were common, instilling fear in the public. Medical science was ineffective against cholera until John Snow's discovery of its contagion through contaminated water in 1848. Callouts of health officials toasting each other read: "Long life to our Central Board . . . May we preserve our health by bleeding the country . . ."

The Central Board of Health: Cholera Consultation

[Additional file 5]

[Additional file 6]

[Additional file 7]

[Additional file 8]




 

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