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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 93-98

Acute coronary syndrome in young adults from Oman: Results from the gulf registry of acute coronary events


1 Department of Cardiology, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman
2 Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat; Gulf Health Research, Muscat, Oman

Correspondence Address:
Prashanth Panduranga
Department of Cardiology, Royal Hospital, P.O. Box 1331, Muscat-111
Oman
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1995-705X.76799

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Objective: To assess the prevalence, risk factors, presenting features, and in-hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients ≤40 years of age from Oman. Methods: Data were analyzed from 1579 consecutive ACS patients from Oman during May, 2006 to June, 2007, as part of Gulf RACE (Registry of Acute Coronary Events). ACS patients ≤40 years of age were compared with patients >40 years of age. Results: A total of 121 (7.6%) patients were ≤40 years of age with mean age of 36 ± 4 vs. 61 ± 11 years in young and old adults, respectively (P<0.001). More men were seen in the younger age group (81 vs. 60%; P<0.001). Among all the coronary risk factors, young patients had more history of smoking (47 vs. 15%; P<0.001), obesity (72 vs. 58%; P = 0.009), and family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) (16 vs. 7%; P = 0.001). Both groups received aspirin, statins, thrombolytic therapy, and anticoagulants equally; however, younger patients received clopidogrel, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, b-blockers, and in-hospital coronary angiogram more. Younger patients experienced less heart failure (6 vs. 27%; P<0.001) and in-hospital mortality, especially among STEMI patients (0 vs. 10%; P = 0.037). Conclusions: Young ACS patients from Oman have different risk profile. They were treated more aggressively and their outcome was better, which is similar to other populations. However, smoking, along with obesity and family history of CAD were strong risk factors in the young Omani ACS patients. There is a need for prevention programmes to control smoking and obesity epidemic by targeting young adults in the population.


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