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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 12-17

Relationship between admitting nonfasting blood glucose and in-hospital mortality stratified by diabetes mellitus among acute coronary syndrome patients in Oman


1 Department of Cardiology, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman
2 Department of Non-communicable Diseases Control, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman
3 Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University and Gulf Health Research, Muscat, Oman

Correspondence Address:
Prashanth Panduranga
Department of Cardiology, Royal Hospital, PO Box 1331, Muscat, PC-111
Oman
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1995-705X.81554

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Background and Objectives: Hyperglycemia in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is associated with increased in-hospital mortality. We evaluated the relationship between admitting (nonfasting) blood glucose and in-hospital mortality in patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) presenting with ACS in Oman. Patients and Methods: Data were analyzed from 1551 consecutive patients admitted to 15 hospitals throughout Oman, with the final diagnosis of ACS during May 8, 2006 to June 6, 2006 and January 29, 2007 to June 29, 2007, as part of Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events. Admitting blood glucose was divided into four groups, namely, euglycemia (≤7 mmol/l), mild hyperglycemia (>7-<9 mmol/l), moderate hyperglycemia (≥9-<11 - mmol/l), and severe hyperglycemia (≥11 mmol/l). Results: Of all, 38% (n = 584) and 62% (n = 967) of the patients were documented with and without a history of DM, respectively. Nondiabetic patients with severe hyperglycemia were associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared with those with euglycemia (13.1 vs 1.52%; P<0.001), mild hyperglycemia (13.1 vs 3.62%; P = 0.003), and even moderate hyperglycemia (13.1 vs 4.17%; P = 0.034). Even after multivariate adjustment, severe hyperglycemia was still associated with higher in-hospital mortality when compared with both euglycemia (odds ratio [OR], 6.3; P<0.001) and mild hyperglycemia (OR, 3.43; P = 0.011). No significant relationship was noted between admitting blood glucose and in-hospital mortality among diabetic ACS patients even after multivariable adjustment (all P values >0.05). Conclusion: Admission hyperglycemia is common in ACS patients from Oman and is associated with higher in-hospital mortality among those patients with previously unreported DM.


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