Heart Views

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 77--82

Gender differences among patients with acute coronary syndrome in the Middle East


Aliah Ali Khesroh1, Faisal Al-Roumi1, Ibrahim Al-Zakwani2, Sreeja Attur3, Wafa Rashed4, Mohammad Zubaid3 
1 Department of Medicine, Al-Amiri Hospital, Kuwait
2 Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University and Oman Gulf Health Research, Muscat, Oman
3 Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait
4 Department of Medicine, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Jabriya, Kuwait

Correspondence Address:
Aliah Ali Khesroh
Senior Registrar, Internal Medicine, Al-Amiri Hospital, PO Box 26866, Safat 13001
Kuwait

Background: There is controversy regarding the relationship between gender and acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective: To study the impact of gender on presentation, management, and mortality among patients with ACS in the Middle East. Methodology: From January 2012 to January 2013, 4057 patients with ACS were enrolled from four Arabian Gulf countries (Kuwait, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Qatar), representing more than 85% of the general hospitals in each of the participating countries. Results: Compared to men, women were older and had more comorbidities. They also had atypical presentation of ACS such as atypical chest pain and heart failure. The prevalence of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (49 vs. 46%; P < 0.001) and unstable angina (34 vs. 24%; P < 0.001) was higher among women as compared to men. In addition, women were less likely to receive evidence-based medications such as aspirin, clopidogrel, beta-blocker, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on admission and on discharge. During hospital stay, women suffered more heart failure (15 vs. 12%; P = 0.008) and were more likely to receive blood transfusion (6 vs. 3%; P < 0.001). Women had higher 1-year mortality (14 vs. 11%; P < 0.001), the apparent difference that disappeared after adjusting for age and other comorbidities. Conclusion: Although there were differences between men and women in presentation, management, and in-hospital outcomes, gender was shown to be a nonsignificant contributor to mortality after adjusting for confounders.


How to cite this article:
Khesroh AA, Al-Roumi F, Al-Zakwani I, Attur S, Rashed W, Zubaid M. Gender differences among patients with acute coronary syndrome in the Middle East.Heart Views 2017;18:77-82


How to cite this URL:
Khesroh AA, Al-Roumi F, Al-Zakwani I, Attur S, Rashed W, Zubaid M. Gender differences among patients with acute coronary syndrome in the Middle East. Heart Views [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Dec 15 ];18:77-82
Available from: http://www.heartviews.org/article.asp?issn=1995-705X;year=2017;volume=18;issue=3;spage=77;epage=82;aulast=Khesroh;type=0