Heart Views

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 87--92

Percutaneous antegrade and retrograde endovascular approach to symptomatic high-grade subclavian artery stenosis: Technique and follow-up


Santhosh Krishnappa, Jayasheelan Mambally Rachaiah, Srinidhi S Hegde, Kanchanahalli Siddegowda Sadananda, Manjunath Cholenahally Nanjappa, Govardhan Ramasanjeevaiah 
 Department of Cardiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Santhosh Krishnappa
Department of Cardiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, TB Sanitorium Campus, K.R.S. Road, Mysore, Karnataka
India

Background and Purpose: Angioplasty and stenting of the subclavian artery have been reported with high technical and clinical success rates, low complication rates, and good midterm patency rates. Different antegrade or retrograde endovascular catheter-based approaches are used. Nowadays, endovascular therapy has taken over open surgical techniques in subclavian artery disease. The purpose of this study was to determine safety, efficacy, and midterm clinical and radiological outcome of the endovascular treatment with special focus on the different technical approaches in subclavian artery disease. Materials and Methods: Between 2014 and 2017, 11 patients (10 men, 1 woman) with symptomatic high-grade stenosis (90%–100%) of the subclavian artery were treated with endovascular treatment. Their mean age was 51.3 years (range, 32–61 years). Mean angiographic and clinical follow-up was 22.5 months (range, 5–44 months). Clinical follow-up was performed at hospital discharge and routine follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 12 months, and 6 monthly thereafter. In all 11 patients, a percutaneous approach was used successfully. In eight patients, the lesions were accessed retrogradely through a brachial artery puncture. Results: Acute success rate was 100%. There were no significant peri-procedure complications. At the latest clinical follow-up (mean of 22.5 months), all patients showed a good outcome with a restenosis rate of 18.2% including a patient with Takayasu arteritis. Conclusion: Percutaneous antegrade and retrograde stenting of high-grade subclavian artery stenosis is a viable less invasive alternative to open bypass surgery with good midterm clinical results and patency rates.


How to cite this article:
Krishnappa S, Rachaiah JM, Hegde SS, Sadananda KS, Nanjappa MC, Ramasanjeevaiah G. Percutaneous antegrade and retrograde endovascular approach to symptomatic high-grade subclavian artery stenosis: Technique and follow-up.Heart Views 2019;20:87-92


How to cite this URL:
Krishnappa S, Rachaiah JM, Hegde SS, Sadananda KS, Nanjappa MC, Ramasanjeevaiah G. Percutaneous antegrade and retrograde endovascular approach to symptomatic high-grade subclavian artery stenosis: Technique and follow-up. Heart Views [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Oct 18 ];20:87-92
Available from: http://www.heartviews.org/article.asp?issn=1995-705X;year=2019;volume=20;issue=3;spage=87;epage=92;aulast=Krishnappa;type=0