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   2003| June-Aug  | Volume 4 | Issue 2  
    Online since June 22, 2010

 
 
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HISTORY OF MEDICINE
Arab Roots of European Medicine
David W Tschanz
June-Aug 2003, 4(2):9-9
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ORIGINAL PAPER
Transcatheter Closure of Perimembranous and Muscular Ventricular Septal Defects in Children with the Amplatzer Occluder: Experience in Qatar
Assad Al-Hroob, A Eltohami, SM Gendi, Y El Yemeni, MT Nuhman, Z Hijazi
June-Aug 2003, 4(2):3-3
Transcatheter Amplatzer device closure has been used to close muscular ventricular septal defects with satisfactory results. A new asymmetric Amplatzer perimembranous ventricular septal occluder has been specially designed for closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects. We report our initial experience with ventricular septal defect (VSD) device closure from January 1, 2003 to August 31, 2003 using the new Amplatzer perimembranous and muscular ventricular septal occluders. During the eight-month period, we closed 13 VSDs percutaneously, 10 perimembranous and 3 muscular. The mean age was 9 years (range 3-17 yrs), mean weight of 33 kg (range from 10.6-69 kg). The mean VSD size by TEE was 9.7 mm (range 6-12 mm); Qp: Qs was a mean of 1.44:1 (range of 1.1:1 to 2.2: 1). The mean device size was 10.0 mm (6-14 mm). Immediate and complete closure was achieved in 11 patients (92%). One patient with a muscular defect had a residual shunt and multiple other smaller defects. In another patient, the device was retrieved because of device related aortic insufficiency (AI). Complications included LBBB in one patient; two patients developed tricuspid regurgitation (TR), one mild and the other moderate; two patients developed trivial AI, and one with pre-closure AI, improved after closure. On follow up, the LVEDD improved from a mean of 4.4 cm (3.4-5.9) to a mean of 4.0 cm (3.2-5.5cm) at three months. We conclude that transcatheter occlusion of perimembranous and muscular VSDs is safe, feasible and effective; however, this excellent immediate result and short term follow up need to be confirmed by large scale intervention trials and long term follow up.
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CASE REPORT
Erythromycin-induced Torsade De Pointes
Amar M Salam, Ali Ashraf
June-Aug 2003, 4(2):6-6
  568 0 -
EDITORS PAGE
At a Glance
Rachel Hajar
June-Aug 2003, 4(2):1-1
  553 0 -
PERSPECTIVE
Valve conservation in type a aortic dissection : Is it justified?
Pasquale Mastroroberto
June-Aug 2003, 4(2):5-5
  434 0 -
SPECIAL SECTION
Chairman's Reflections: Part 14
HA Hajar Albinali
June-Aug 2003, 4(2):10-10
  413 0 -
EDITORIAL
"Does the Left Hand Know. . ."
Roxane McKay
June-Aug 2003, 4(2):4-4
  385 0 -
CARDIOVASCULAR NEWS
Cardiovascular News

June-Aug 2003, 4(2):2-2
  382 0 -
ART AND MEDICINE
Medicine in Graphic Satire

June-Aug 2003, 4(2):8-8
  333 0 -
A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS
Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm

June-Aug 2003, 4(2):7-7
  285 0 -
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